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How to Keep Your Invisalign Retainers Clean

Posted by on Nov 21, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

When you go to the dentist, they instruct you on how to keep your teeth clean and fresh  It is equally important to keep your Invisalign retainers clean and fresh. Invisalign allows you to straighten your teeth without the need to wear braces. You never have to go without eating popcorn or eating a chewy caramel because you can take the retainers out in order to eat.  The downside is that they can get a film on them from plaque, become smelly, get discolored and feel dirty. Here are some great ways to thoroughly clean your Invisalign retainers using products that you can find at home. Brush Your Teeth      Before you put your Invisalign retainer in your mouth, be sure that your teeth have been brushed and are free from plaque. It is a good idea to floss and rinse as well. Removing as much food particles and left behind debris from eating will keep your retainer fresher for longer periods of time. Any food trapped in your retainer could cause it to discolor as well. If you can’t brush, try to rinse thoroughly with water before putting your retainers back in.    Vinegar       You can soak your retainer in white distilled vinegar mixed with warm water for a half hour.  When you take it out of the liquid, be sure to gently brush it with an extra soft toothbrush and rinse it well.  If you don’t rinse it well enough, you may go about your day tasting the vinegar.  The vinegar will kill some of the germs that build up throughout the day.  Mouthwash       If your retainer has an odor, combine ½ cup mouthwash and ½ cup water and soak your retainer for a few minutes.  This will kill some of the bacteria that causes odor.  Only soak your retainer in this mouthwash and water mixture occasionally.  The alcohol in the mouthwash could damage it if you do it often.  Hydrogen Peroxide       Hydrogen peroxide will also kill bacteria that cause odors on your retainer. Mix ½ cup peroxide and ½ cup water and let your retainer soak for a half hour. This will not remove any plaque buildup on your retainer, but it will be fresher and will not smell.  Denture Tablets      If you are in desperate need to soak your retainer, a denture tablet is not recommended for use every day. Once in a while you may choose to soak it in a cup of warm water with one denture tablet. This will definitely make your retainer fresher, but it could cause damage and discoloration after repeated use.  Other Tips     In order to keep your Invisalign retainer clean, here are some other helpful tips: Never eat or drink while you are wearing your retainer. Always rinse the retainer as soon as you take it out.  Store it in water if possible. This will keep the plaque and saliva from drying on the retainer and you’ll keep the bacteria from actively growing.  Invisalign is an orthodontic treatment that is meant to be invisible. Keeping your retainers clean and free from debris keeps them from being noticed. After your Invisalign treatment is over, you’ll have perfectly straight and beautiful teeth, and no one will have ever known you were wearing them. Get more tips from clinics such as Sunshine...

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Root Canals – Not As Scary As You May Think

Posted by on Nov 20, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

If your dentist has recommended that you get a root canal, your first reaction may be one of fear. There have been many myths over the years about the pain associated with getting a root canal. In actuality, the pain of a root canal is similar to that of getting a filling. Dentists and endodontists have come a long way in making their patients comfortable when having a root canal procedure done. Here is some information that may ease your mind, explaining what having a root canal will do for you and how it will be done. What Is A Root Canal? A root canal is the process of having infected pulp in the root area of your mouth, replaced with another material, allowing the tooth to stay in place. There are many reasons why the pulp in the root area can become infected. Having a lot of work done on one tooth can be the reason. It can happen from tooth decay or gum disease. It could also be the result of damage to the tooth which results in a crack. The bacteria that causes the infection will need to be removed during a root canal procedure. How Is A Root Canal Done? When you go to your root canal appointment, you will first have anesthesia administered so that you will not feel pain from the procedure. A thin vinyl sheeting will be placed over your mouth, and the tooth that is being repaired will be pushed through a hole in the sheet so it is separated from the rest of your teeth, leaving it in a sterile environment during the process. A small hole will be drilled in the back of the tooth being repaired so that the pulp and root area is exposed for the endodontist or dentist to work with. The dead pulp will be removed from the chambers of the root area. This will allow your tooth to no longer feel any pain. The chambers will be flushed out with an antiseptic solution and will be filled in with a rubber like material. This will be coupled with a sealant so that bacteria cannot come back inside the area. A temporary filling material will be adhered to the hole that was drilled so that the root structure is no longer exposed. You would then need to heal from the process, using antibiotics and aspirin to keep away infection. After healing, a crown or a permanent filling will need to be placed over the existing tooth, covering the hole completely. To learn more, contact a company like Washington Township Dental Associates with any questions or concerns you may...

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Types Of Porcelain Crowns

Posted by on Nov 19, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Crowns can vary quite a bit, but what they all share in common is that they encapsulate or cover a tooth or implant. This is different from veneers since they are a complete replacement of the surface area of the tooth, rather than a thin surface covering for the sake of protecting or improving the aesthetics of an otherwise decent tooth. Crowns are usually necessary when a tooth has been structurally compromised, needs to be restored–or, similar to some forms of dentures, is being mounted as part of an implant. Because of the complexity of the procedures and materials necessary, crowns tend to be relatively expensive.  When it comes to crowns, there are several main types–ranging from all ceramic, various metals, and anything in-between. All-Metal/”Gold” Crowns: The classic metal crown is made from a variety of metals and alloys, most of which involve gold. These are among the most durable since they are a solid piece and do not wear down opposing teeth, although these depend on the properties the particular metal choice offers. The only downside is that they are obviously artificial in appearance. Because of this, they aren’t usually placed in high-visibility areas, such as the front of the mouth. Porcelain Crowns: As the name implies, porcelain crowns are constructed entirely of various kinds of dental ceramic engineered specifically for this purpose. There is no better looking crown available, as the color and translucency of all-ceramic crowns like Zirconia are practically indistinguishable to the real thing. This makes it absolutely amazing for a high-profile tooth, such as a canine or incisor. The only drawback is that their durability isn’t quite as high as either all-metal crowns or PFM crowns. However, it’s worth noting that this depends on the individual, since some porcelain crowns have survived 50+ years with no problems. As a result, it would be best to defer to your dentist’s judgment in regards to this option. Porcelain-fused-to-metal Crowns: And then we have porcelain-fused-to-metal-crowns, which are basically hybrids of the previous two methods that involve ceramic or porcelain veneers over a metallic core. These offer many of the benefits of both worlds, with as few of the shortcomings as possible. They are strong, durable, and natural-looking, which makes them great for any tooth. However, the biggest downside is that most reveal a thin dark line along the gum line where the crown ends, which can be seen if your gum line recedes. They’re also capable of wearing opposing teeth, or even chipping. However, the risk of chipping only applies to the ceramic veneer rather than the metal core, so there’s minimal risk for structural...

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How To Quickly Take Care Of A Dental Emergency

Posted by on Nov 18, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

If your tooth has been knocked out, cracked, or chipped, or if you’re experiencing severe mouth pain or bleeding, you’re one of many Americans who is experiencing a dental emergency. That may seem serious, especially since many accidents happen when your primary dentist’s office is closed. However, though time is of the essence, it’s generally possible to see a dentist at any time of day or night – and as a bonus, your insurance may help cover emergency dental care procedures even if you aren’t seeing your regular dentist. Treating Pain and Missing Teeth Losing a tooth can be frightening – and sometimes painful – but you can take a few steps to ease the pain and help make your dentist’s job a little easier before you see them. For teeth that have fallen or been knocked out, hold your tooth by the crown, rinse it off, then either place it back in its socket or wrap it in gauze damp with your own saliva. Do not let it dry out or get dirty, and do not touch the root. If you’re able to see a dentist quickly after losing a tooth, they may be able to place it back in your mouth and help it heal correctly. For teeth that have been loosened and have started to move, attempt to move the tooth back into position with your finger, then bite down to keep it from moving until you see a dentist. For fractured or chipped teeth, rinse your mouth with warm water and use an ice pack for any pain. If a piece of your tooth was chipped, having the chipped piece can be beneficial, but not necessary. A dentist can use other materials to restore your tooth’s appearance and functionality. Emergency and 24/7 Dentists When looking for a dentist to see quickly, you might encounter some differences in what you find. For example, an emergency dentist may not necessarily be available at all hours of the day. If you require help during the night or early morning, look specifically for offices that are open 24/7. Some online services offer the ability to search through dentists in your area by various criteria, such as emergencies and different hours. Before going anywhere, call ahead and inform the dentist about your situation. This will help them get ready to work immediately. Alternatively, if they don’t offer what you need, calling ahead saves you the drive – and the dentist may be able to recommend you to someone else nearby. Coverage Whether your emergency procedure is covered by your dental insurance or not depends on your specific type of coverage, but in many cases it is likely that emergencies are at least partially covered whether you’re seeing your usual dentist or not. What dental insurance often does not cover are what are considered cosmetic procedures like teeth whitening, bleaching, or...

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Implants, Botox, Dermal Fillers, And A New You: A Great Smile Is More Than Just Perfect Teeth

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Just as dentistry is about more than teeth, smiling isn’t only about good manners.  Consider these facts: Smiling increases the brain’s available serotonin–a neurotransmitter that elevates mood–in much the same way as many common anti-depressants.  Research has demonstrated that other people’s perception of a smiling face is more positive than one that has a frown (or no expression at all).  More importantly, a smiling face increases people’s urge and inclination to be helpful. By releasing endorphins, a smile acts like an analgesic–nature’s bottle of aspirin permanently stuck to your face. However, further research has attached some troubling caveats to these ideas.  Not every smile produces these effects. Generally, only aesthetically pleasing smiles exhibit such positive tendencies.  In addition, people are more likely to associate words like “reliable” and “sincere” with a physically attractive smile–and a physically attractive smile involves more than just teeth. If you’re about to get dental implants–or if you have them already–then you need to ask your dentist (or prosthodontist/periodontist) about Botox and/or dermal fillers.  Implant dentistry is, of course, a crucial step toward obtaining that great grin you know you deserve–but it’s not the only step.  A fantastic smile is about jawlines, lips, gums, and teeth. Implants can address one of those factors; used correctly, Botox and fillers can do the rest. Why dentists? Only about 8% of North American dentists have embraced Botox as an effective treatment for medical and cosmetic issues.  From a dento-facial aspect, Botox can successfully treat temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ), teeth grinding (bruxism), and pain caused by illness or injury.  Every dentist is permitted by law to use it for such medical purposes; most states, however, require additional training for cosmetic applications.  Some dentists do not consider Botox/fillers within their purview for any usage.  Increasingly, though, medical science is conceding that dentistry is the only field specifically trained just for cranio-facial procedures and problems; because they administer more injections to the face than any other medical specialty, they are accordingly knowledgeable about related nerve networks and muscle groups.  It makes more sense for your dentist–rather than a plastic surgeon–to successfully use Botox and fillers! Why now? If you’re committing to implants, then obviously you’re committed to improving your smile–and, consequently, the overall appearance of your face.  If you’re older or have premature wrinkles, Botox can be extremely effective.  Missing teeth can cause changes in the jaw and lips, which may need to be restored with fillers.  Whether you’re unsatisfied with a thin upper-lip or a low gum-line–or any other aspect of your face–talk to your dentist or oral specialist about cosmetic procedures that, along with implants, could improve your appearance.  If he or she dismisses the idea, then seek an opinion from a dentist certified in Botox and filler applications.   If you and your dentist have decided that implants are right for you, don’t be afraid to think outside of the “dentistry-is-only-about-teeth” box!  You’ve come this far already, why not take that extra step toward a perfect smile by improving your lips, teeth, jaws, and...

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3 Reasons To Stick With Dental Products Containing Fluoride

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Like countless other substances used in everyday life, the fluoride used in most toothpastes and mouthwashes is dangerous in very large doses. This had led to many incorrect fear mongering reports claiming that it causes any number of health problems and should be avoided entirely. Unless you’re allergic to fluoride or drinking water already treated with this important mineral, you should definitely keep using dental products that include it to get these three health benefits. Battle Bacteria Food residue gets stuck in the grooves on and between the teeth, creating the perfect environment for bacteria that damage the teeth. Applying a little fluoride through daily brushing and rinsing reduces the damaging effects by loosening the bacterial layer known as plaque. This increases the effectiveness of the brush’s bristles and the abrasives in the toothpaste. Aside from lowering overall bacteria levels, the fluoride helps control the amount of acid they produce. Lower acid levels lead to stronger teeth because these bacterial by-products leech important minerals out of the teeth. Without enough fluoride, you get thicker plaque layers, higher levels of bacteria, and greater acid concentrations around the teeth. Strengthen Enamel Fluoride plays an important role in the natural process of remineralization. Your saliva is constantly adding calcium and reinforcing the enamel that protects the surface of each tooth, and fluoride is necessary to ensure you add more enamel than you lose over the course of each day. The signs of mineral loss can show up quickly after you switch to a fluoride-free toothpaste, and these symptoms include: A loss of white color through the tooth, leading to a translucent look White and brown spots that show up just above the gum line or on the biting surfaces Pitting and roughened surfaces on and between the teeth Prevent Cavities By controlling bacterial levels and reinforcing the enamel layer on the teeth, fluoride is the best way to prevent cavities. This means fewer trips to the dentist, less time in the chair, and a healthier smile for the rest of your life. Your dentist can let you know if you’re getting enough of this mineral from your drinking water or diet to drop it from your brushing and rinsing routine without putting yourself at risk for more cavities. Children under the age of two are exempt from these benefits because they’re likely to accidentally ingest too much of the otherwise beneficial mineral. Once your children are old enough to brush with only a pea-sized amount of toothpaste, it’s time to make fluoride a part of their daily routine. Starting early with strong mineralization and enamel growth will give them a sparkling smile that takes less work to maintain for the rest of their life. To learn more, contact a company like West Lakes Family Dentistry with any questions or concerns you might...

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6 Reasons To Visit A Pediatric Dentist

Posted by on Nov 13, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

If you have a young child, it’s important to get the best dental care possible. This means taking your child to the dentist early. Studies show that children as young as the age of one should begin seeing a pediatric dentist for the best long-term results. Knowing the reasons to take your child to this specialty dentist may motivate you to do so. Reason #1: Check baby teeth Your child’s first teeth should be examined by a dentist to ensure these have erupted correctly. The health of the baby’s first teeth may impact the permanent teeth that are critical. Reason #2: Break bad habits Does your child still suck a bottle past the normal age? What about sucking on a thumb at all times of the day? These habits can cause problems with the teeth and should be addressed to help the child stop doing these things. Reason #3: Provide necessary tools There is a special toothbrush that should be used by young children and can be provided by a dentist. Additionally, a dentist can give you a special gum cloth that should be used by infants. Reason #4: Explaining how to brush It’s important for the parent to take care of brushing a baby’s teeth or that of a young child. The pediatric dentist can provide the parent with techniques that may save time and be more effective in the process. Additionally, as the child gets older, this dentist can work with the child to ensure proper brushing is being done. Reason #5: Recommend orthodontics When your child reaches a certain age, usually no later than 12, the dentist can tell if the child will need braces or not. If the teeth are crooked and require additional assistance for being as straight as possible, it is necessary to consider braces. Reason #6: Obtain special care Pediatric dentists are trained to provide dental care for young children. This includes taking additional courses to know how to deal effectively with children. By taking your child to this specialty dentist, you can rest assure the best care will be given. Finally, taking care of your child’s teeth at the youngest possible age is one of the best things you can do. Because it ensures that your child will have healthy teeth that will last a lifetime, this is worth the effort. Be sure to rely on the expertise of a pediatric dentist to oversee the dental needs of your child. For more information, contact a local clinic like Smile Builders – Robyn Lesser...

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Tips For Dealing With Oral Health Issues While Pregnant

Posted by on Nov 13, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Being pregnant means worrying about the effects of every element of your life on a small fetus. You have to avoid certain foods as well as certain medicines. So, what do you do when you have oral health issues to address and you happen to be pregnant? If taking an aspirin is dangerous to your fetus, what does that make a cavity or the medication you need to treat your oral health issues? Here you can learn why tending to your oral health when you are pregnant can be even more important than it is when you aren’t pregnant. Treat Gum Disease Early If you know that you have gum disease before you get pregnant, address the issue before the pregnancy happens. If you are already pregnant and you have gum disease, it’s important to take care of it so that it doesn’t cause problems with the fetus. Gum disease can increase your risk of premature birth or low birth weight in your baby. Since the organs of the fetus are developing during the first trimester, it’s best to seek treatment during the second trimester. Your dentist can help you come up with a viable oral health plan for the pregnancy so that you can reduce any risk to the baby, including the risks associated with unaddressed gum disease. Tend to Cavities and Infections Cavities and infections can be painful for you, but the pain and the poison of the infection combine to cause high blood pressure and potential strain on the fetus. Cavities and infections disperse poison through the bloodstream, which means it eventually reaches your baby. These oral health issues can change the way you eat, impacting the nutrition that your baby receives. The stress of dealing with constant pain can increase your anxiety levels and with them, your blood pressure. The medication used to deal with a cavity or extraction is safe to use while pregnant. If you have any concerns about the treatment methods or medications used to do an extraction or filling, talk to a dentist at an office such as Quality Dental Care. He or she will be happy to put your mind at ease and set up a safe time to perform the procedures that are required. Your dental health professional is concerned about your health and your oral issues, but he or she isn’t going to risk the health of your baby either.   ...

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